The Alabama Moderate

Painting the Red State Purple.

We Really Aren’t All That Different

Posted by ALmod on May 24, 2007

A controversial new poll hit the news early yesterday:

“The study found that among the nation’s younger Muslims, 26 percent say homicide bombings can at least rarely be justified ‘in order to defend Islam from its enemies.'”

You have to ask yourself about the question that was asked.  How was it phrased?  The reason that I wonder about these things is because of the public reaction during the trial and sentencing of Eric Robert Rudolph, who was responsible for bombing a Birmingham abortion clinic among other things.  I remember very well the letters that were written to local newspapers, including The Birmingham News.  I remember people talking about how the doctors were killing babies and how they got what they deserved.  I wonder what percentage of Christians would say that killing might be rarely justified in order to kill a true enemy of God.  Don’t get me started on what percentage of Christians are die hard supporters of the death penalty– not because it’s the law, but because they believe that the accused truly deserves to die.   They are, after all, evil.

If were you faced with pure evil and there was no question, and it threatened to destroy the very fabric of Christianity, is there any possibility that it would ever be justified to kill someone?  How do you answer that?  Let me turn this one around for the atheists.  If you child were in danger…?  What would it take to answer the question in the affirmative?  Is the killing of another human being ever justified?  Can someone get me the latest polls on the Iraq War and tell me what the current percentage in support is?

My question was answered within mere minutes.

“…Campbell County authorities arrested a Liberty University student for having several homemade bombs in his car. The student, 19-year-old Mark D. Uhl of Amissville, Va., reportedly told authorities that he was making the bombs to stop protesters from disrupting the funeral service [of Rev. Jerry Falwell].”

I might add that one of those protesters just happened to be Fred Phelps.  You might know him as the guy who likes to protest funerals of dead soldiers and hold up signs that read “Thank God for IED’s”.  And this is the funeral of Jerry “Kill Them All in the Name of the Lord” Falwell.  A man who himself encouraged such views among (dare I say) roughly 26% of Evangelical Christians.  The student who was arrested attended Falwell’s own Liberty University.

I should also mention that I originally planned to make this my first post on The Gun Toting Liberal, but Gunny beat me to it and pretty much had the very same reaction.

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5 Responses to “We Really Aren’t All That Different”

  1. […] you to our co-blogger J.B. Massey of Alabama Moderate for linking in – Technorati Tags:  Christianity, Current Events, Fundamentalists, GLBT, Headline News, […]

  2. Lee P said

    I’m not a fan of Jerry Falwell, but I’m unaware that he ever suggested that we should “kill them all” in the name of religion. If he did, please enlighten me.

  3. ALmod said

    Lee, there are video clips everywhers. It shouldn’t be too hard to dig one up. I’ll see if I can find it on YouTube. Otherwise, a quick Google search should give you all the info you need.

    The full quote was something like, “We’re gonna hunt them down, and smoke them out, and kill them all in the name of the Lord.”

    If someone else finds the full quote or audio or video before I get around to it, they’re more than welcome to post it.

  4. Lee P said

    OK…I guess this is what you’re talking about:

    In a televised debate on CNN, Falwell said President Bush should “blow them (the terrorists) all away in the name of the Lord.” …

    “Falwell’s comment came on “CNN Late Edition With Wolf Blitzer” in a debate with Baptist minister Jesse Jackson, who called the Iraq war “a misadventure” that isolated the United States politically and cost the country lives, money and “our character.”

    Falwell, pastor of Thomas Road Baptist Church in Lynchnurg, Va., responded: “I’d rather be killing them over there than fighting them over here, Jesse. And I think you would. …”

    “Let’s stop the killing and choose peace,” Jackson responded. “Let’s choose negotiation over confrontation.”

    “Well, I’m for that too,” Falwell added. “But you’ve got to kill the terrorists before the killing stops. And I’m for the president to chase them all over the world. If it takes 10 years, blow them all away in the name of the Lord.”

    I won’t defend that comment, but its worth pointing out that Falwell was talking about killing terrorists – i.e. those who are themselves guilty of taking innocent lives indiscriminately.

    As it seemed to me that you were associating Falwell with people like Fred Phelps and Eric Rudolph, I thought you were suggesting that he had advocated violence against abortion doctors or homosexuals or some other group that he might have described as “enemies of God.” To my knowledge, he never did that.

  5. ALmod said

    Actually, I was talking about a different quote, but that one pretty much says the same thing he said before.

    In both cases, he was talking about terrorists, yes. Still, saying that you want to kill someone “in the name of the Lord” is pretty much doing the same thing that they are doing.

    To compare him with Fred Phelps and Eric Rudolph is merely comparing fundy nutjobs who would condone such violence. Violence in different ways, per se, but still violence with religious motivation. Falwell would not blow up a building, but he would advocate holy warfare. Phelps wouldn’t advocate warfare, but he has suggested that homosexuals be burned. (That’s why he’s particularly fond of the word “fag.”) Rudolph, I believe, is pretty much open to anything.

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